CSA Week 8: A Sweltering Summer Day

snow

Hi CSA members

As I write this update, it is the first really hot, sweltering day here in Minnesota. So I thought it might be refreshing to remind us of the snow and cold just a few short months ago. This is a picture of our bunkhouse, the little cabin where our WWOOFers stay. Wouldn’t it feel great to roll in all of that beautiful, fluffy snow right now??! You have to love living in Minnesota… such a crazy, diverse climate where we hearty residents can endure it all!

Ok… now, down to business. Here is what you’ll find in your box this week.

week 8

Peas - Normally peas are all gone by now. Usually due to my mother-in-law who will set up a lawn chair in the garden and munch the peas right off the vine. But that’s beside the point. It was a long, cold spring, and even the peas took a long time to germinate, but they are finally here. Personally, I like to eat them the same way my mother-in-law does…. as a fresh snack, husk and all.

Vine-ripened heirloom tomatoes - The tomatoes have been torchering me this year. The plants are big, healthy, and full of tomatoes, but they have been very, very, very, VERY, slow to ripen. They’ve been teasing me for the past few weeks, and finally, a very small amount have ripened enough to eat. In the spirit of the CSA…. where the members share in the risk and the bounty with the farmer…. I am sharing the bounty of the very small amount of ripe tomatoes I have right now. It’s just a handful for each of you. I am hopeful that the rest of the tomatoes will be ready soon as well.

Parsley - This herb is more than just a pretty garnish. It is also aids in digestion, has anti-inflammatory properties, and is a breath freshener to boot. Chop it up and add it to cream cheese for an easy and tasty dip, or add it to a salad.

Broccoli - I have lots of this ready now, so you’ll be seeing this again in the future.

Cucumbers - You’ll be seeing more of these too.

Zucchini - yellow, green, striped, or ribbed.

Lettuce - it won’t be long until the lettuce is done for the season. I have more that is being seeded for the fall, but lettuce doesn’t grow very well in hot conditions.

As always, here is the pick-up and delivery schedule for this week.

St. Cloud offices - Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op - Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community - Tuesday afternoon, probably between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

Made of Mora - Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms - Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Friday morning by 10:00 a.m.

And don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Cheers,

Debbie

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CSA Week 7: Lots of Aromatics

Week 7

Hi CSA members

I was really hoping to include a nice big batch of tomatoes this week, but they are taking their time ripening up. I have, however, been taste testing the few cherry tomatoes that have ripened, and boy oh boy are they ever good. So it won’t be long.

This week includes some really nice smelling things that will delight your palate and your nostrils.

Basil - an assortment of four different kinds of basil: purple, Italian, lemon, and Thai. Oh my do they smell good, and each variety has a slightly different aroma. The best way to prepare basil is to make pesto. Or used in your favorite pasta dish or top a pizza. Here are a few recipes for you to try.

Broccoli - The broccoli crop is just starting to appear. I’ve planted three different varieties of broccoli. This first variety is a little smaller than other varieties, however it is ready sooner than others. So starting thinking of your favorite ways to prepare it because there will more again in the future. Also, don’t be too quick to chop off the leaves and throw them out. The leaves are also very good and adds a unique texture to your dish.

Cucumbers - One of my favorite ways to enjoy cucumbers is to slice it up, drop it into a pitcher of water, add some lemon, then let it chill for a couple of hours. It’s a refreshing beverage on a hot summer day

Scallions - Another wonderfully aromatic veggie. This is the last of the scallion crop this season, but onions will soon be on the way.

Zucchini - You’ll find one of four different varieties – yellow, dark green, striped, or ribbed. No matter what it looks like, you can use any variety in the recipes on my website.

Kohlrabi - this too is the last of the crop for the season. If you haven’t yet figured out how to prepare it, here is a nice article all about kohlrabi and some easy ways to serve it.

Lettuce - I’m still able to keep the greens coming for just a little while longer. Usually lettuce is pretty hard to grow in July due to the hot weather. So I’ll keep it coming as long as I can.

As always, here is the pick-up and delivery schedule for this week.

St. Cloud offices - Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op - Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community - Tuesday afternoon, probably between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

Made of Mora - Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms - Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Friday morning by 10:00 a.m.

And as always, don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Cheers,

Debbie

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CSA Week 6: Hodgepodge of Spring and Summer.

Week 6

Hi CSA members

Even though summer was officially here a couple of weeks ago, we are now officially transitioning from spring to summer. Many of the summer crops are just starting to ripen up. That’s why this week the boxes will have a little bit of hodgepodge of spring and summer crops. Here’s what you’ll find:

Garlic scapes - If you’re not familiar with what this is, it is the curly, long-stemmed flower that is at the top of a growing head of garlic. They are very simple to use, just chop them up like you would a scallion, and use them in a dish just like garlic. Personally, I love garlic and eat it as much as possible. I also think that there should be garlic-flavored breath mints or room fresheners. Garlic breath should not be offensive, but appreciated.

Zucchini - I’m quite sure that this is the most versatile veggies of all. It can be eaten raw, by slicing it up and dipping into a sauce, it can be cooked in a variety of ways, or it can be used in desserts such as sweet breads. Plus it comes in many colors – yellow, dark green or even striped. It’s a good thing it is versatile, because it is also very prolific, so you’ll be seeing a lot of it this season. And of course, I have lots of recipes on the website for you try out as well.

Kale - This is one of the most nutritious veggies that you could ask for. Just like zucchini, it too is quite versatile and can even be used as a meat replacement in Minnesota hot dishes. Check out some of the recipes I’ve got on the website.

Hodgepodge Surprise - The broccoli is just beginning to come into season. But there isn’t enough for all of the boxes this week. Same with the peppers. Plus I have some remnants of other things from earlier crops. Therefore, your box will have either: broccoli, hot peppers, bok choi, or radishes. But you won’t know for sure until you open it up.

Cucumbers - two of them for you to enjoy.

Kohlrabi - you’ll probably remember these from last week. My favorite way to eat them is slice them thinly, add some salt and pepper and munch away.

Scallions - A handful of green and purple onions. Also great as a breath freshener if you ask me.

Lettuce - By now you’ve had lots of experience with this.

Now that we have passed the 4th of July holiday, we are back to our regular schedule:

St. Cloud offices - Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op - Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community - Tuesday afternoon, probably between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

Made of Mora - Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms - Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Friday morning by 10:00 a.m.

And as always, don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Cheers,

Debbie

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CSA Week 5: A Picnic or Potluck

dorixena

Hi CSA Members

So here’s the scoop…. Our awesome WWOOFer, Sarah left this morning to head back to the east cost. That means right now we are temporarily WWOOFerless and today I had to do the harvest, cleaning, and packing of your veggies all by myself [enter violins]. So by the time I was done this evening, the batteries in all of the smart phones and cameras in our entire household were dead. Therefore, I couldn’t take a photo of the produce in your box. So instead of sending you a photoless email, I opted to add a photo of our dogs. Meet Xena, the Jack Russel Terrier, and Dori, the German Wirehair Pointer. Aren’t they cute?! Once all of the batteries are recharged, I’ll add a photo of the produce to this post on our website.

Can you believe it is already July?? Wow, even though life inside the hoop house has been awesome, life outside in the field has been really rough this year. Originally I was planning to have a lot more veggies ready for you for your 4th of July family get together. But it appears that several of the veggies that were supposed to be ripe this week, didn’t read the manual. The good news is that I’ve disciplined them, and they should be ready soon (more on this below).

So here is what you’ll find in your box this week…

Maple syrup sampler - a cute little 1 oz sampler bottle of Sapsucker Farms maple syrup. It’s just enough for one serving, but at least you’ll get a taste of the real thing. Let me know if you are interested in a larger bottle - 17 oz. glass bottle for $15

Cucumbers - These veggies did read the manual and they are ready right on time. In 2013, they won the prestigious Sapsucker Farms “Most Prolific Vegetable” award too, so you can plan on seeing more of them this season.

Kohlrabi - If you’ve had this before, you’ll know that it is a delightfully crunchy brassica that can be used in cole slaws, cooked, or braised. For those of you who haven’t heard of this, it is like a cross between a radish and a cabbage. I’m not sure where the name “kohlrabi” came from, but if I was the one who invented it, I would call it a “rabbage” or maybe a “crabbish.” If I had a photo of it, you would see a round bulb-like thing, about the size of a baseball, with leaves on it. Don’t just clip off those leaves as they too are very good, much like a cabbage. And as you know, I do have recipes on the website as well.

Scallions - a big handful of a random combination of either purple pearl, purple scallions, or white scallions.

Red Romaine Leaves - the last of the redheads. A big bag of leaves, ready to add to a sandwich or chop up for a salad.

Buttercrunch lettuce - A head of tender heirloom lettuce.

BOXES - please, please, please, return your boxes as soon as you can. I am running low and need them back so I can refill them for you again in the future.

Now, back to those veggies that were supposed to be ready this week… these crops are ooooooh so close to being ripe:
Broccoli - some cute little heads are peaking through the leaves
Peas - they’re peaing alright
Zucchini - lots of tiny little ones almost ready
Peppers - some hot ones are emerging and lots more coming soon
heirloom tomatoes - the tomato plants are already taller than me, and they’re full of green tomatoes. Just waiting for them to ripen up.

So, back to the 4th of July. Since Friday is a holiday, Cambridge folks, please note that you’ll be picking up your boxes on THURSDAY instead. Here’s the schedule:

St. Cloud offices - Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op in St. Cloud - Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community - Tuesday early afternoon probably between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

Made of Mora - Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms - Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - THURSDAY by 10:00 a.m. (this week only)

And don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Enjoy your holiday weekend!

Debbie

P.S. Here’s a photo of this week’s harvest.

week 5

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CSA Hiatus

Breeching whale

I know it’s crazy for farmers to take a vacation in the middle of the growing season, but that’s just what we did. A one-week hiatus from the CSA enables the crops to grow and catch up after this long, cold, and wet spring. For us, we had a chance to go on our annual salmon fishing trip to Alaska to refill the freezer with some fish, and to play with our dear friends in Wasilla.

 

This year, the fishing was not very good. We arrived just after the first salmon run in the Kenai and Russian rivers were over. So instead, we took a boat tour out of Seward to see the wildlife in the Kenai Fjords National Park. And boy oh boy, did we score! We saw sea otters, a pod of orcas, mountain goats, a sleeping whale, a humpback whale with a baby, dolphins, puffins, a multitude of sea birds, and the active calving Holgate glacier. But the most exciting thing we saw was this breaching humpback whale. This fella was having a great time playing and showing off for us.

 

Now we are refreshed and ready to get back to farm work.

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CSA Week 4: Womboks, WWOOFers, and Other Thingies.

week 4

Hello CSA Members

Did you know that we are a WWOOF farm? Yes indeed. We are a host farm with Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) which is an international organization that matches up volunteers with organic farms. And the individuals who volunteer are called “WWOOFers.” This is our second year with the program and we have been so blessed by having so many wonderful young folks come and work on our farm. I’ve profiled them all on our website as well. Right now we have two hard-working WWOOFers…. the awesome Sarah Danly from Boston, and the Aussie Emily Gruzin from Sydney Australia. A huge THANK YOU goes to both of them for all of the work they’ve done to help me get this week’s produce in your box.

Awesome Sarah Danly

Sarah

So here is what you’ll find this week:

WOMBOKS - Earlier this week, Aussie Em said to me “You have some huge Womboks in your hoop house!”

Huh? I have HUGE WOMBOKS in my hoop house??!  Oh no! This can’t be good! With this devastating news, I immediately began to put together my plan to organically eliminate these creatures from my beloved hoop house… probably by using a shot gun. Now I admit, I didn’t know exactly what a wombok was, but I figured that they had to be the hungrier, meaner, troll-like cousins of the Ewoks from Star Wars. And they were in my hoop house!

Fortunately, before I put my wombok extermination plan into action, Aussie Em explained that a “wombok” is Australian for “Napa Cabbage.” Hmm. Go figure. Meanwhile, Awesome Sarah explained that in Boston, it is called “Chinese Cabbage.” Wow. I guess I don’t speak fluent Australian or Bostonian.

So you can decide what you prefer to call it - wombok, napa cabbage, or Chinese cabbage - you’ll find one in your box this week. And if you don’t know how to prepare your wombok, napa cabbage or Chinese cabbage, you can check out the recipes on the  website.

Aussie Em, with womboks in the hoop house.

womboks

BOK CHOI - this will be the last week of “oi” (baby bok choi, tatsoi, or joi choi). I realize that I planted a heck of a lot of it this year… enough to feed an army of womboks. So I hope you have discovered some delicious ways to prepare them, or you can check out the recipes on the website.

ROMAINE - A nice big head of romaine lettuce.

FANCY LETTUCE - A smaller head of heirloom lettuce that is tender and delicate. A nice complement to the romaine.

SUNFLOWER SHOOTS - Oh man, I love these. Crunchy, nutty, and oh so tasty, they are sprouted sunflower seeds that are great in salads, on sandwiches or just as a snack. Super yum.

OTHER THINGIES - I am happy to report that the cucumbers and pepper crops are beginning to mature. However, right now there are only a few of each so there is not enough for everyone. Don’t worry, there will be plenty for all very soon. But for this week, you’ll find some one of these other thingies in your box… you’ll get either a cucumber, or a couple of hot peppers, or rhubarb, or a handful of radishes with greens (don’t throw out the greens, they’re also very good!). It’ll be a mystery for you until you open up your box and see what you get!

REMINDERS

  • Full share members… as noted in the CSA Schedule that I sent out earlier this spring - there will be NO CSA BOXES NEXT WEEK. The week of 6/23 is a hiatus, and the CSA will resume the week of 7/1
  • Cambridge folks… please note that for the week of 7/1 your boxes will be ready on THURSDAY 7/3 instead of Friday 7/4 due to the July 4th holiday
  • Boxes… Please be sure to return your waxed boxes and cooler packs so I can re-use them. Cambridge folks, you don’t need to worry about this since the Co-op keeps the boxes. Everyone else, please return your boxes to the place where you picked them up.

As for picking up your boxes this week, it’s the usual schedule:

St. Cloud offices - Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op in St. Cloud - Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community - Tuesday early afternoon between noon and 1 p.m.

Made of Mora - Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms - Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Friday by 10:00 a.m.

And don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Enjoy,

Debbie

 

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CSA Week 3: Big and Small.

Week 3

Hello CSA Members,
This week you’ll be seeing some big things and small things in your box.

Napa Cabbage - a big honkin’ head of Napa cabbage, also known as Chinese cabbage. This is an asian cabbage with curly leaves and can be used for salads, stir-fries, and other dishes. Some suggested recipes can be found on the website.

Radishes with greens - first of all, don’t just toss out the radish greens. The greens are also very tasty, a spicy green, somewhat like arugula. It can be added to salads, used as a pizza topping, or braised. Here are some recipes to try. You will also notice that there are some big radishes and little radishes. In fact some of them are itty bitty…. even teeny weeny…. but I included them in the box because the greens are delish. Among the harvest, I discovered one albino radish too…. it’s quite unique looking, and one of you will be getting it…. who will be the lucky recipient?? But I confess, I didn’t thin the radishes in a timely manner which is why you’ll find some teeny tiny ones in the mix. So I may not be the best radish farmer, but the greens are tender and add some variety to the table.

Red Romaine - a nice big head of it for you to enjoy.

Baby Oakleaf lettuce - this is a small head of bright green, fancy lettuce. It is very delicate, almost kind of lacey looking, and darn near melts in your mouth.

Deer Tongue Buttercrunch lettuce - Another small head of dark green lettuce, and you’ll notice that the leaves actually do look like big tongues from deer. If that image bothers you, then just close your eyes and enjoy this delightful green.

Bok Choi - your box will include either a big stalk of bok choi, or a couple of small stalks, depending on the variety you get in your box. Either way, all of the recipes for bok choi that is provided on the website can be used for any variety of bok choi that you may get in your box.

The pick-up/delivery schedule is as usual:

St. Cloud offices – Tuesday morning

Good Earth Co-op in St. Cloud – Tuesday morning

Plymouth Community – Tuesday early afternoon

Made of Mora – Thursday by noon

Sapsucker Farms – Thursday after noon

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge – Friday by 10:00 a.m.

And don’t miss out on all of the activities on the farm and follow us on our Facebook page and Twitter @SapsuckerFarms.

Enjoy,

Debbie

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CSA Week 2: Seeing Green.

week 2

Hello CSA Members

First of all, welcome to all members. While the full share members received their first box last week, half share members will be receiving their first box this week. At long last, spring is [allegedly] here in Minnesota, and the greens in this week’s box is proof of that.

But before I explain what you’ll find in your box… first a little housekeeping. (Full share members, you’ve heard this before… bear with me until we all get into the swing of things this season).

Here are a few instructions regarding timing, when, and how to pick up your boxes. There are some slight variations depending on your location, so please take note.

Your CSA will be delivered in a waxed produce box, plus it will have a cooler pack inside (except for Cambridge folks), of which both are re-usable throughout the season. So please be gentle with the box and return it along with the cooler pack for reuse each week. Plus, depending on where you pick up your box, there are a few things to know. So here it goes:

St. Cloud offices - for those of you who receive your boxes at your office, I’ll be dropping off your boxes on Tuesday mornings. Then you simply have your box and cooler pack ready for me to pick up when I deliver your box the next week. That’s it.

St. Cloud Good Earth Co-op - Your boxes will be delivered to the co-op on Tuesday mornings. To pick up your box, go to a cashier, let them know that you are picking up your CSA and they will direct you to the break room where the boxes will be ready for you. Then, next week when you pick up your new box, please return your old box, collapse it, and leave the flattened box on the shelf where you pick up your new box. Follow that?

Plymouth - your boxes will be delivered to the pool/community room on Tuesdays around noonish. Just return your box and cooler pack to the pool/community center before I drop off your new box the next week and I will take it from there.

Made of Mora - your boxes will be ready for pick up by noon on Thursdays. Simply return your box and cooler pack to Made of Mora the next time you pick up your box.

Sapsucker Farms - For those of you who are picking up here at the farm, your box will be ready after noon on Thursday. For your first time picking up, let me know when you think you’ll be picking up your box so I’m here to show you where to pick it up and drop off your boxes.

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Boxes will be delivered on Friday mornings by 10:00 a.m. To pick up your box, you will need to go to a cashier, then they will retrieve your box, but they want you to bring along a bag to bring your goodies home. The co-op will keep the box and hold it for me next time I drop off boxes.

I’ll remind everyone of these procedures for the first couple of weeks, then we’ll all get into the swing of things and will know what to do in the future.

Eggs - many of you have inquired about eggs. Yes, we do have eggs, and if you would like eggs included in your CSA box, they are $3 per dozen. If you are interested, just let me know, you can pre-pay by the month, or for the whole season, as some of have already done. They’re pretty darn good…. nothing beats super fresh eggs, straight from the hens (ahem)…. well… you know…

Now… here is what you’ll find in your box this week:

Lettuce - two varieties: romaine and bib butter crunch. Romaine is a sturdy standard that you are no doubt very familiar with, and bib butter crunch is a very tender heirloom variety that you probably won’t see in the grocery store as it is somewhat fragile. That’s why it’s so tender, crunchy, and delicious.

Some form of “Oi” - huh?? Let me explain. I planted three varieties of asian greens: Baby Bok Choi, Joi Choi, and Tatsoi. So you’ll get one of these three varieties, but each box will be different. So I can guarantee that you’ll get some form of  “oi” and that any form of oi can be used in any of the “oi” recipes I have for you on my website.

Spinach - Popeye the Sailor Man will be jealous. This spinach isn’t any of that sissy baby stuff that is commonly found in the store. Oh no… get out your chopping knives because this variety of spinach has impressively large leaves… but yet is delicate and tender too. But unlike Popeye’s fare, this is fresh and organic, not canned. (Ok… for the younger folk… if you don’t know who Popeye is, just google it and this will make sense).

Arugula - This peppery green is versatile for salads, sautéed, or used as a pizza topping. It’s also really fun to say. Go ahead, say it out loud “A-ROO-ga-la.” Wasn’t that fun? I like to make arugula pesto, and of course, you can find the recipe on my website.

Rhubarb - This is actually the only thing that is not green this week. My personal favorite way to serve rhubarb is rhubarb custard pie. Just plain amazing. And of course, you can find the recipe on my website.

Other random news from the farm

  • It’s  raining
  • I’ve gotten a lot of planting done and many crops are doing well
  • Due to the rain, a few other crops have not yet been planted, but I’m hoping to get them in the ground soon
  • I love my hoop house
  • I’m happy to report that the dog, who cornered a skunk last week, did not get sprayed. Whew
  • Today (June 2nd) is our 35th wedding anniversary
  • This week we welcome our new WWOOFer (volunteer) from Australia who will be working on the farm for the next 2 weeks

Until next week, you can keep up with what’s happening on the farm with our Sapsucker Farms Facebook page, or follow me on Twitter @SapsuckerFarms. This email will also be posted on the website as well.

Cheers,

Debbie

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First CSA Box of the Season

week 1

While it’s been a very challenging spring… cold…. wet… more cold…more wet… late planting…. I’m happy to report that the crops in the hoop house have been able to conquer these challenges. And to date, the crops have also been thriving.
But before I explain what you’re getting this week, first a few housekeeping thingies.

Your CSA will be delivered in a waxed produce box, plus it will have a cooler pack inside, of which both are re-usable throughout the season. So please be gentle with the box and return it along with the cooler pack for reuse each week. Plus, depending on where you pick up your box, there are a few things to know. So here it goes:

St. Cloud offices - for those of you who receive your boxes at your office, I’ll be dropping off your boxes on Tuesday mornings. Then you simply have your box and cooler pack ready for me to pick up when I deliver your box the next week. That’s it.

St. Cloud Good Earth Co-op - Your boxes will be delivered to the co-op on Tuesday mornings. To pick up your box, go to a cashier, let them know that you are picking up your CSA and they will direct you to the break room where the boxes will be ready for you. Then, next week when you pick up your new box, please return your old box, collapse it, and leave the flattened box on the shelf where you pick up your new box. Follow that?

Plymouth - your boxes will be delivered to the pool/community room on Tuesdays around noonish. Just return your box and cooler pack to the pool/community center before I drop off your new box the next week and I will take it from there.

Made of Mora - your boxes will be ready for pick up by noon on Thursdays. Simply return your box and cooler pack to Made of Mora the next time you pick up your box.

Sapsucker Farms - For those of you who are picking up here at the farm, your box will be ready after noon on Thursday. For your first time picking up, let me know when you think you’ll be picking up your box so I’m here to show you where to pick it up and drop off your boxes.

City Center Market Co-op in Cambridge - Boxes will be delivered on Friday mornings by 10:00 a.m. To pick up your box, you will need to go to a cashier, then they will retrieve your box, but they want you to bring along a bag to bring your goodies home. The co-op will keep the box and hold it for me next time I drop off boxes.

I’ll remind everyone of these procedures for the first couple of weeks, then we’ll all get into the swing of things and will know what to do in the future.

Now… what’s in your box this week:

Eggs - one dozen very fresh eggs. You’ll see brown and green eggs, that’s because the Rhode Island Red chickens lay brown eggs, and the Aracauna chickens lay greenish colored eggs. This is the one and only time that eggs will be included in the CSA boxes. If you would like more eggs in the future, just let me know, they are $3 per dozen and we can add them to you box in the future if you desire. If by chance you are vegan, and you are offended by my including them in the box, I sincerely apologize. And you now have 12 little weapons you can fling at my house in revenge. Or, you could donate them to the local food shelf, and I know they would appreciate them.

Rhubarb - The season is short for this delightfully tart treat. My fave is to make rhubarb custard pie, which you will find among the rhubarb recipes on my website.

Bibb Butter crunch lettuce - this is a delicate, tender head of lettuce that is very mild and crunchy. And just so you know, I have a LOT of lettuce growing, so you’ll be seeing a lot more in the future.

Arugula - this is a peppery, spicy, green that can add some zip to salads, or can be used as an ingredient in a number of different dishes, such as some of the recipes included on my website.

Pea Shoots - tender sprouts from peas that are tasty used on sandwiches, added to salads, or just eaten as a snack, which is what I do.

Rosemary plant - This is a live plant, you can keep in your kitchen, watch it grown, and snip off fresh rosemary as you need it. Or, you can just take a big sniff of it every day, and enjoy the wonderful aroma of fresh rosemary. Just give it a little water and it’ll be happy for a long long long time. But, if by chance the plant has a short life in your household, fear not! Don’t throw it away. The dried leaves from a dead rosemary plant is also good. In fact, that is what you would find in the jars of dried rosemary on the spice shelves in the grocery store.

Meanwhile, you can keep up with what’s happening on the farm with our Sapsucker Farms Facebook page, or follow me on Twitter @SapsuckerFarms. This email will also be posted on the website as well.

Until next week…..

Enjoy,

Debbie

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East and West Coast WWOOFers

asv

Andrew Davis is from Maryland. And from California. Ethan Lockshin is from Maryland. And from California. They just graduated from high school and are now off to Colorado and Washington. It was a pleasure having these bright, well-traveled young men join us for two weeks on the farm this spring. They were lots of help to get this slow spring off to a fast start. And the best part is that they plan to make another visit to the farm again in the future.  Thanks for all of your hard work guys!

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